Excellent Essay From Victor Davis Hanson: ‘Crossing the Trump Rubicon’

From American Greatness

EXCERPTS:

We are in a veritable war of competing visions. The strife inside the two parties is irrelevant—when compared to the larger existential war for the soul of America.

……the Trump presidency on all fronts is all that now stands in the way of the completion of what was started in 2009.

We are no longer in the late 1950s era of liberal reform. It is now a postmodern world of intolerance and lockstep orthodoxy.

There are few Berkeley-like free speech areas on college campuses any more. Students charged with particular crimes enjoy little due process. There is no Joan Baez-style acknowledgement of the tragedy of good Southern poor men fighting for an awful cause. No one acknowledges tragedy anywhere at all; it has all become melodrama. We may yet see Joan Baez’s version of The Band’s ballad or Shelby Foote’s commentaries in Ken Burn’s epic Civil War documentary Trotskyized.

The media is not disinterested. Networks such as CNN see their role actively on the barricades, devoted to the higher cause of destroying the Trump presidency, not as reporting its successes or failures. The danger to free expression and a free media is not even Trumpian bombast. It is the far more deliberate and insidious transformation (begun in full under Obama) of journalism into a progressive ministry of truth. Even if he wished, Trump could not take away what the professional press already surrendered voluntarily.

After the nocturnal effort to tear down historic statuary, the NFL player psychodramas, the therapeutic reactions to radical Islamic terror attacks inside the United States, and the often unhinged profanity and assassination chic of the anti-Trump “Resistance,” Trump almost alone seems to sound off in opposition.

And while reform and protest may be innate to the American character, traditions and values of the past simply cannot be airbrushed away because a particular generation suddenly believes that the dead of a far more hazardous and impoverished age must meet their own transitory mores of the present.

On one side are traditionalists who believe the United States is the most exceptional nation of a uniquely self-critical West. They believe that we need not be perfect, past or present, to be good and certainly are and were always far better than the alternative. And while reform and protest may be innate to the American character, traditions and values of the past simply cannot be airbrushed away because a particular generation suddenly believes that the dead of a far more hazardous and impoverished age must meet their own transitory mores of the present. Oddly, few of the Republican establishment speak out for them.

The new progressive Left believes that America has always been defined by its collective sins, which outweigh those of other cultures. They identify the white heterosexual male as the font of most pathologies (cf. the Democratic National Committee’s unapologetic effort not to hire white males for some of its jobs). Like it or not, Trump is now a central figure in resisting a full-scale dismantling of the idea of the uniquely individual, free, and outspoken American.

……Like most neo-socialists, the new progressive party that supplanted the old Democratic Party promotes social justice in relative terms, and not defined by absolute incomes of the middle class.

The new progressivism would prefer an America in which everyone made about $50,000 a year, overseen by a far greater and more intrusive government (of properly insightful and caring souls, whose selflessness would earn exemption from the consequences of their ideologies) to the alternative of a country where a small minority made well over $1 million but the middle classes achieved average incomes of $75,000.

……Like Trump or not, by the end of his first three quarters of his presidency, GDP growth had rebounded and was growing at a pace set to achieve 3 percent for the year. Real unemployment (U6) had fallen below 8 percent; business and consumer confidence were at record levels. Energy production was likewise. Manufacturers expressed confidence unlike that seen in the last two decades. Corporate profitswere unparalleled. The radical turnabout was largely Reaganesque in spirit—predicated on a new can-do psychological climate, ending insidious deregulation, the specter of impending tax-cuts, and a determination that manufacturing could return to the United States if energy was cheaper than elsewhere and industry had proper incentives. One can see the sudden bustle anywhere one goes.

 

Much to the angst of the convulsive Dems, Trump is reversing the damage Barky did to our economy, foreign policy, domestic policy, and national security.

The RINOs need to get on board with the agenda we elected in 2016, or get replaced.

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